Monday, February 1, 2010

Coffee Bean Roast #2 – Modification & Results

(If you want the whole scoop of our initial attempt at roasting coffee beans, please go HERE).

In previous posts I forgot to include a picture of green coffee beans. Here is what we started with…

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The modification: Mr. W placed a steel plate over the fish cooker burner to diffuse the heat. Just a plate of 3/16” steel.  Excellent idea! I’m told you can also use a cast iron pan for that purpose. We roasted two batches – again using the Colombian Supremo green coffee beans from Coffee Bean Direct (via Amazon). And again using the Whirley Pop. There was a little smoking involved, but it wasn’t unpleasant (like before). We’ve learned that we may have to ignore the thermometer a bit as “first crack” seemed to arrive at 250 degrees F or so (if we wanted to believe that thermometer).  Also, by the end of the roast, we had barely reached 400 degrees F.  We can now understand that it’s probably best to learn to judge the beans on smell and appearance, as well as listening for those 1st & 2nd cracks.

The best part this time was that we were able to actually see the beans while they were roasting. With our maiden roast, it was smoking too badly and we couldn’t see the beans when we opened the lid. This time we could actually check every 3-4 minutes (or more often toward the end) and see that the beans were going from green, to the various stages of brown. Awesome! The smell wasn’t nearly as bad this time. Let me emphasize this – we could actually breathe in the Roasting Room (aka Blacksmith Shop).

We did two roasts this time. Each one took approximately 15 minutes. We kept the heat on high, but with the diffusion from the steel plate, the roasting process was slow and nice.  And, I assure you, these roasted beans smell yummy! Definitely not burnt offerings. Here are the successfully roasted beans, in all their glory --

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I put the beans in our Melitta Mill and Brew pot last night, set the time for 5:10 a.m., and we were awakened with….

…the wonderful aroma of fresh ground, fresh roasted coffee. The taste? Delicious. I think at this point we’re hooked.

If you’d like a synopsis of why people roast their own coffee beans, check out Wikipedia's explanation. Thanks goes again to Jayme for introducing me to home roasting! Without her encouragement, I would have given up with that first burnt offering batch.

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21 comments:

OsageBluffquilter said...

I can't wait to have a cup of your homemade java! I just hope the blackmsith shop can reopen as an iron forging shop again!

Dandy said...

That is so cool! I've never seen the green coffee beans before! I am very impressed.

Kilauea Poetry said...

I'm sure there is nothing quite like it! I mean we try to purchase quality coffee beans then grind them fresh..
You've taken it to a much better level! Maybe if I wasn't such a coffee lover I wouldn't find this process quite so intriguing! Thanks and bravo for the update- terrific instructions and results- Regina-

Karen said...

Ah, the sweet smell of success! (sorry, couldn't resist.) I'm so glad it worked out for you!

Down On The Farm said...

I am not a coffee drinker at all, but I DO love the SMELL of coffee! Enjoy every moment of that coffee. Aren't God's little pleasures good?

Laurie at The Turner Farm said...

The steel plate is a great idea, thanks for sharing. Will give it a try.

Elle Bee said...

This is so interesting! I bet you have the freshest tasting coffee around! The roasted beans sure look beautiful. I think this is an awesome hobby. Maybe you should sell your own special FCF roasts! :o)

Q said...

My husband and I enjoy our coffee. I shall tell him about your roasting method. We just might give it a try. I bet it is the best cup of coffee ever. We do grind our beans but freshly roasted just sounds delicious!
I will let you know if we go for it!
Sherry

Amy @ River Rock Cottage said...

What a difference those look like from the one's before! I wonder if their is a roasting method to make a coffee low acid - or would that be the bean variety?

Catherine said...

The whirley pop (isb it the thing to make popcorn?) have got the same, so i can roast coffee beans in it! good idea!

Mrs A said...

I am enjoying reading your blog :) Thanks for posting about roasting coffee roasting :)

Growing Up A Country Girl said...

I don't like coffee but I do enjoy the smell - and I can smell these beans! Glad it was successful this time around...

Feral Female said...

Oh Tammy, my mouth is watering yet again! I`m glad to hear this time things went well. There is nothing like a good cup of joe!=)

Jayme, The Coop Keeper said...

yay!!!! I knew you would get it. We use a propane camp stove to do ours, in the whirley pop. I just keep the flame really low, and the popper cranking. I don't pay attention to temperature, time or anything. I just go by how the beans look. Once you take them to a second crack, things really get smoky and it's hard to see, isn't it? I've found that I like a medium roast in our home roasted beans, where I always bought a dark roast before. I'm so happy for you that you are doing this! Welcome to the wonderful world of DELICIOUS COFFEE!!!!

Kritter Keeper said...

great! so glad it worked this time!

McVal said...

YUM! I don't like coffee, but I LOVE the smell of it brewing and cappuccino!

Jackie said...

Congratulations on your second attempt! Sounds like a lot of fun.

Jackie

Nezzy said...

I remember the wonderful smell in my Granny's old farm house when she roasted 'real' coffee beans. Enjoy your java!!!

God bless ya'll and have a fabulous day!!!

Rural Revival said...

Congrats! Why don't you come by for a skate and bring some of that heavenly aroma brew with you? : )

Be well! ~Andrea~

Ann On and On... said...

That must have been satisfying to achieve an amazing (yummy) product.

Cheryl said...

Congrats! I am so glad that it didn't take long to get it right! I love the smell of brewing coffee....I can smell it now.

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